Journal Volumes XIII-XVI

Below is a summary of the contents of Volumes XIII to XVI of the
Journal, which were those published between Autumn 2003 and Spring 2007.

More detailed descriptions of all Journal articles from Vol. I, No. 1 to the present day can be downloaded in pdf format by clicking HERE.

Additionally, the contents of Journals Vol. I, No. 1 to Vol. XXIV, No. 2 arranged by subject matter can be downloaded in the form of a ROUGH GUIDE compiled by former Society chairman Nick Lynch.

Vol. XIII, No. 1, Autumn 2003

H. St. John B. Armitage: Lawrence and Gertrude Bell in the Wilderness of Zin?

St. John Armitage takes to task one writer for his assumption that Lawrence had clandestine meetings with Gertrude Bell for intelligence reasons when he was surveying in the Wilderness of Zin.

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Graham Chainey: Review of The Wilderness of Zin

Graham Chainey’s review of the new edition of The Wilderness of Zin, originally published in The Times Literary Supplement, is reproduced here.

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G. Wilson Knight: T. E. Lawrence

Professor G. Wilson Knight, the eminent Shakespearean scholar, produced a chapter on Lawrence for his 1968 book Neglected Powers which is now reprinted here.

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Auler Pasha: Notes on the Construction of the Hedjaz Railway

The numerous problems associated with the building of the Hejaz Railway in 1901 are briefly dealt with in Auler Pasha’s notes on its construction. Contemporary photographs of the railway have been taken from F. A. Talbot’s book The Railway Conquest of the World.

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Vol. XIII, No. 2, Spring 2004

Brian Porter: Britain and the Middle East in the Great War

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H. St. John B. Armitage: The Hijaz Railway

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H. St. John B. Armitage: T. E. Lawrence, A Sketch Map

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H. St. John B. Armitage: T. E. Lawrence and Douglas Carruthers

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David Omissi: The Royal Air Force in Iraq and India in the 1920s

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Vol. XIV , No. 1, Autumn 2004

Jeremy Wilson: John E. Mack, MD

A tribute to the late John Edward Mack.

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Jeremy Wilson: Seven Pillars – Triumph and Tragedy

This issue of the Journal is devoted to the writing, printing and publishing of Seven Pillars of Wisdom. In his article, Jeremy Wilson
describes how the book evolved and the various abridgements that were considered, rejected and finally accepted and published as the Subscribers’ Edition of 1926.

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Manning Pike: Notes on Printing Seven Pillars of Wisdom [Published with the permission of Jane Pike, daughter of the author]

The author describes how he got involved in printing the 1926 Subscribers’ Edition.

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Peter Wood: In Search of the Elusive Manning Pike

Information about Manning Pike’s colourful life was unearthed by the research carried out by Peter Wood, and forms the basis of his article.

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H. J. Hodgson: How the Seven Pillars of Wisdom was Printed

At fourteen, Herbert Hodgson was apprenticed to a printer. After World War I, the opportunity arose to join Manning Pike in printing a private press book, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, under the supervision of its author. After three years working with Lawrence, Hodgson had reached a standard that enabled him to join the famed Gregynog Press as pressman.

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Hazel K. Bell: ‘Discursive, Dispersed, Heterogeneous…’: Indexing Seven Pillars of Wisdom

Hazel K. Bell  describes the problems and vicissitudes she had to contend with in compiling a comprehesive index for the 1922 text of Seven Pillars published by Jeremy Wilson.

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Vol. XIV, No. 2, Spring 2005

Jeremy Wilson: St. John Armitage, An Appreciation

A tribute to St. John Armitage who died in October 2004. He contributed to the Journal and Symposia, and was one of the Society’s trustees.

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Paul Helfer: T. E. Lawrence and the Sassoon Cousins

Paper given to the Society’s 2004 Symposium, discussing Lawrence’s friendships with the poet Siegfried Sassoon and his cousin, the politician and collector Sir Philip Sassoon.

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Jeremy Wilson: From Euphoria to Crisis: The First Hundred Days of the Arab Revolt. A Selection of Contemporary Documents

The first of a series of selections from British military and political archives to be published in the Journal. This initial group takes a closer look at events merely summarised or alluded to in the early chapters of Seven Pillars of Wisdom.

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Air Vice Marshal William Munro Yool: Lawrence’s Last Days in Arabia

A recollection of Lawrence during the closing stages of the latter’s diplomatic work in Trans-Jordan in 1921.

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Vol. XV, No. 1, Autumn 2005

Susanna K. Hieremias: Lawrence’s Grave through Seventy Years – A
Pictorial Essay

A photographic essay looking back to Lawrence’s funeral at
Moreton.

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Mary Bryden: Lawrence, Malraux, and the French Aventurier Figure

This paper looks at the fascinating multiple linkages and parallels
between the writer André Malraux and Lawrence. It investigates the basis for Malraux’s fascination with Lawrence, in relation to the French adventurer figure.

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Jeremy Wilson: From Crisis to Chaos: Five Weeks of Confusion in the Arab Revolt

This is the second selection of contemporary documents relating to British involvement with the Arab Revolt (see Vol. XIV, No. 2). The documents are reproduced as written and reference is made to the relevant passages in Seven Pillars.

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Matthew Coniam: Lawrence the Outsider – An Interview with Colin
Wilson

Colin Wilson’s first book The Outsider used existential philosophy to bring fresh insight to enigmatic characteristics of those literary and historical figures that he feels typify the character-type of the title. One of these is Lawrence. This paper records an interview with Wilson, where he is asked further probing questions about his book and his views on Lawrence.

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Vol. XV, No. 2, Spring 2006

Lawrence in Yiddish: a Bibliographical Detective Story

This article prints in full a recently discovered pamphlet about Lawrence written in Yiddish.

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Mark Calderbank: Seven Pillars: Which Version?

This paper looks at literary differences between the 1922 Oxford Text and the abridgement published as the 1926 Subscribers’
Edition of Seven Pillars of Wisdom, with a view on which version is better written.

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Christophe Leclerc: Mesentente Cordiale: Feisal’s Visit to France, 26 November-9 December 1918

Feisal’s trip to France in late 1918, during which he remained on good terms with his hosts but achieved nothing of substance diplomatically, is well described as ‘mesentente cordiale’ or ‘friendly lack of agreement’.

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Khinlyn Fern: Lawrence of Arabia’s Fire Tank/Swimming Pool at Clouds Hill, Dorset

This article originally appeared in the proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society. It looks at the history of Lawrence’s fire tank at Clouds Hill through his letters.

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Matthew Hughes: What did the Arab Revolt Contribute to the Palestine Campaign – An Assessment

This controversial paper was first presented at the Society’s 2004 Symposium, where the author claimed that Allenby could have beaten the Turks without the help of Lawrence and the Arab Revolt.

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Vol. XVI, No. 1, Autumn 2006

The papers in this issue of the Journal were presented at the International Lawrence of Arabia Conference, held at Lee University, in Cleveland, Tennessee, in April 2006.

T. Sam N. Moorhead: Lawrence, Zin and the Arab Revolt

Sam Moorhead wrote an introduction to the 2003 edition of The Wilderness of Zin, where he provided much background and arguments in relation to the context of the book.

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Stephen E. Tabachnick: An Attempt to Map the Lawrence Territory: Writing Lawrence of Arabia: An Encyclopaedia

The Encyclopaedia and how it was written, with the many difficulties, are described by the author.

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Daniel Hoffman: Lawrence and Crac des Chevaliers

This paper looks at that ‘most wholly admirable castle in the world’ which Lawrence described in his Oxford thesis on Crusader architecture. The author describes the history and parts of the castle in relation to what Lawrence saw during his three-day stay there in 1909.

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Benjamin Adam Saidel and Gary L. Christopherson: Four Days at Khalasa: Using Aerial Photography and GIS Analysis to Reappraise Woolley and Lawrence’s Survey of Byzantine Elusa in the Western Negev Desert

This paper demonstrates that the contributions of Woolley and Lawrence’s survey, as exemplified by their fieldwork at Khalasa, have been underestimated by archaeologists.

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Gerald L. Mattingley: Woolley and Lawrence on the Location of Ancient Kadesh-barnea

The debate over the location of Kadesh-barnea, a very important site in early narratives, is a significant and fascinating case study in early Biblical site identification. The 1915 and newer 2003 publication of The Wilderness of Zin represent a major turning point in this historical-geographical debate.

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Rupert Chapman: T. E. Lawrence’s Archaeological Methods and Results

The author concludes that in some respects, Woolley and Lawrence’s work in the Negev and Sinai was far ahead of its time.

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Vol. XVI, No 2, Spring 2007

Jonathan Black: King of the Pictures: Eric Kennington, Portraiture and the Illustration of Seven Pillars of Wisdom, 1920-26

Describing the pleasures and perils of Eric Kennington in producing the series of portraits and other illustrations which were such an
integral part of Lawrence’s vision for the sumptuous Subscribers’ Edition of Seven Pillars of Wisdom.

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Pieter Shipster: From Ink to Oil: T. E. Lawrence and the Schneider Trophy

An expanded version of the paper presented at the Society’s 2006 Symposium,  describing an important but somewhat neglected episode in Lawrence’s RAF career when he became very much tied up in the arrangements for the 1929 Schneider Trophy race.